Tag: joepa

Change Scope

Filter By

99 for 99 - #29 - The First Game of the Gill Era

The Bulls wins 9-3 in overtime to give Turner Gill his first win as UB Coach.

Why It Isn't Wrong To Attack The Recently-Departed JoePa

The media should spend less time celebrating JoePa, and more time finding out how an 85-year-old man could make such an egregious error, Inhistoric writes.

Nice article by Rick Reilly about Joe

Links to the site which we do not speak of, here's the text: Maybe you will never be convinced Joe Paterno was a good man who made one catastrophic mistake, but do you have time for just one story? In 2000, Penn State freshman defensive back Adam Taliaferro had his spine crushed when tackling an Ohio State player. He lay on that September field paralyzed and panicked. The first person he saw when he opened his eyes was Paterno, who died Sunday at 85. "He could see I was losing it, but his eyes stayed totally calm," Taliaferro remembers. "And I remember that familiar, high-pitched voice, going, 'You're gonna get through this, Kid. You're gonna be OK.' And I just trusted him. I believed it." Taliaferro wound up in a hospital bed in Philadelphia, everything frozen solid below the neck. Doctors said he had about a 3 percent chance of walking again. And every other week Paterno would fly to Philly to see him. "He'd bring our trainer and a couple of my teammates," Taliaferro says. "Nobody in the hospital knew he was there." Paterno would tell him all the dumb things his teammates and coaches had done lately. Pretty soon, Taliaferro would be laughing his IVs out. "I can't tell you what that meant to me," says Taliaferro, now 30. "I'm stuck in that hospital, and here's Coach Paterno bringing a piece of the team to me, in the middle of the season. How many coaches would do that?" One midnight, Taliaferro moved a toe and the first person his dad called was Paterno. His dad held the phone to Adam's ear and Paterno said, "You're gonna prove 'em all wrong, Kid!" From then on, every visit, Paterno wanted to see Taliaferro move something new. "I got to where I wanted to be ready. A finger, a hand, whatever. I wanted to perform for Coach Paterno." One day, five months into it, Paterno walked in and said, "What's new, Kid?" Taliaferro swung his legs over the bed, stood and extended his hand to shake. "I'll never forget his eyes," he says. "They were already huge behind those Coke-bottle glasses, but they got even bigger." Paterno gave him a 10-second hug and then said, "Kid, ya make me proud." A man is more than his failings. I learned a lot about Paterno when I wrote a story about him in 1986 for Sports Illustrated. I've learned a lot about him since. He was a humble, funny and giving man who was unlike any other coach I ever met in college football. He rolled up his pants to save on dry cleaning bills. He lived in the same simple ranch house for the last 45 years. Same glasses, same wife, same job, for most of his adult life. He was a man who had two national championships, five undefeated seasons, and yet for years he drove a white Ford Tempo. In 46 years as a head coach, he never had a single major NCAA violation. He was the only coach I've ever known who went to the board of trustees to demand they increase entrance requirements, who went to faculty club meetings to hear the lectures, who listened to opera while drawing up game plans. He was a Depression kid who wouldn't allow stars on helmets or names on jerseys. And he hated expensive tennis shoes. He'd see a player wearing Air Jordans and say, "It's not the sneakers, Kid, it's the person in them." One day Taliaferro wore an entirely different pair into his office, a pair of "Air Paternos" he'd made himself. "He freaked out," Taliaferro remembers. "He was about to call Nike. He thought they were real!" If a player was struggling with a subject, Paterno would make him come to his house for wife Sue's homemade pasta and her tutoring. One time, he told a high-school blue chipper named Bob White he wouldn't recruit him unless he agreed to read 12 novels and turn in two-page book reports to Sue. They were the first books he ever finished. White wound up with two degrees and a job at the university. Paterno was other things, too, like controlling and immovable. He lingered as head coach when he promised time and again he wouldn't. And when he needed to follow up on what he'd been told about Jerry Sandusky and a child in the shower in 2002, he failed miserably. But he followed up for thousands of others. Even though Taliaferro would never play football again, Paterno stayed on him to keep moving. "I came to Penn State to become a lawyer," he told him. "But I never made it. You could, Kid. You're smart." He got the fully recovered Taliaferro a summer internship with the NFLPA in New York and, before you knew it, Taliaferro was a corporate lawyer in Cherry Hill, N.J. He successfully ran for local office there and is now running for the Penn State board of trustees, where he wants to help his school heal from a scandal Paterno made worse with his neglect. "The last three months, I've just wanted to go up on a rooftop and shout, 'I wish you knew him like I do!'" Taliaferro says. "I know, in my heart, if he'd understood how serious this situation was, he'd have done more." I believe that, too. But if you don't, I respect that. I only ask this: If we're so able to vividly remember the worst a man did, can't we also remember the best?

The necessity of morality

Joe Paterno is one of the greatest college coaches ever, but he created a tolerance of misbehavior that ultimately doomed him, and it will haunt his legacy for the rest of time.

Iowa vs Penn State Preview: A Photo Essay

Joe Paterno tries to build a super-quarterback out of Rob Bolden and Matt McGloin, but then says fuck it and brings back Anthony Morelli.

They Got The News, Time To Cruise In Brady's Jeep With The Top Down

LSUFreek outdoes himself yet again. Zoolander + B1G Coaches = Awesome (link fixed)

Ricky Stanzi NFL Draft Profile

A comprehensive look at RIcky Stanzi's strengths and weaknesses. Is Stanzi ready for the NFL?

Joe Paterno And The Bracket Pool

Joe Paterno And The Bracket Pool: Random nonsense.

Joe Paterno Retains A Quarterback

BHGP takes a look at what it must take for Joe Paterno and Penn State to keep freshman quarterback Rob Bolden at Penn State even after the QB requests a transfer to deaf ears.

JoePa's Retiring............Just Kidding!

Really good article discounting the rumors that JoePa is retiring after the Outback Bowl.

X
Log In Sign Up

forgot?
Log In Sign Up

Forgot password?

We'll email you a reset link.

If you signed up using a 3rd party account like Facebook or Twitter, please login with it instead.

Forgot password?

Try another email?

Almost done,

Join Black Heart Gold Pants

You must be a member of Black Heart Gold Pants to participate.

We have our own Community Guidelines at Black Heart Gold Pants. You should read them.

Join Black Heart Gold Pants

You must be a member of Black Heart Gold Pants to participate.

We have our own Community Guidelines at Black Heart Gold Pants. You should read them.

Spinner.vc97ec6e

Authenticating

Great!

Choose an available username to complete sign up.

In order to provide our users with a better overall experience, we ask for more information from Facebook when using it to login so that we can learn more about our audience and provide you with the best possible experience. We do not store specific user data and the sharing of it is not required to login with Facebook.

tracking_pixel_9347_tracker